At the Intersection of Art and Music

Joelsy Fernandez created this piece while listening to the same song 298 times.

Joelsy Fernandez created this piece while listening to the same song 298 times.

A dancer’s heartbeat syncs up with reverberating sound of music as they take their graceful steps. The pull of the bow, the beat of the drum, the strum of the guitar string. An atmosphere is created in films and performances when the highs and lows of a tune set the scene. The crystal clear tone of a singer ties music all together.

In every creative form, dance, film, drama, instrumental and vocal, music has a integral part in how the performers within those forms work. One question that arises is, how does the fine arts connect with music? Paints and brushes aren’t the first thing one thinks of when they hear the word music. So, does music have any effect on the art that students at Frank Sinatra School of the Arts create?

Andy Chen, a senior art student, explains how music has entered his life, and how it influenced his creative endeavors.

“I’ve listened to music and developed my own tastes on my own during the end of middle school, and at that time I started to take art more seriously. So the way many genres I listened to at that time has impacted my artwork today.”

For Andy, bands like Daft Punk, The Pillows and Panic! At the Disco have both music and lyrics that resonate with him. There is a consistent source of inspiration that leads to creative output on paper while listening to music on a daily basis.

Andy Chen was inspired by a soundtrack called "Teknopathic" from the video game "Jet Pack Radio." The fast pace of the song relates to the movement of the figure.

Andy Chen was inspired by a soundtrack called “Teknopathic” from the video game “Jet Pack Radio.” The fast pace of the song relates to the movement of the figure.

For some art students, music is less of a factor in the creative sense, and contributes more to the process. Joelsy Fernandez, another FSSA art senior explains how much music has led her in her artistic journey.

“I don’t listen to music very often, actually. I know most people listen to it during their commute, but I prefer not to. When I do listen though, I tend to like indie rock, folk and oldies music,” she said.

Joelsy’s listening habits aren’t just for enjoyment through the tune or lyrics like most people, but an almost physical guidance when making art.

“I do listen to music while creating. I don’t listen to different songs, I listen to the same song on repeat. The most I’ve ever repeated a song while creating artwork was 298 times in a single day [“Uncle Albert” by Wings]. I think it’s because it helps me be productive with routine, I know what’s coming next in terms of the rhythm, so I guess it contains me in a specific flow. That’s the only way music contributes to my work, I don’t make a habit of interpreting lyrics,” she said.

As one can see, music has different impacts on different people, and the way that people interpret the sounds, beats and lyrics of a song can influence how they create art. No matter what art form someone pursues, music always has an important power in it because it is something that guides us creatively and emotionally. The fact that physical pieces of art are not necessarily performed, there can be a disconnect between the art, artist and the viewer, but getting to understand the inspirations and process of the artist can help bridge that gap. Learning that music is something that touches us all, shows us just one aspect of the arts that can bind us together as human beings.

– by Lisa Moore ’16

Advertisements